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Understanding and Using Health ExperiencesImproving patient care$
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Sue Ziebland, Angela Coulter, Joseph D. Calabrese, and Louise Locock

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780199665372

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2013

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199665372.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 29 November 2020

Using the Internet as a source of information about patients’ experiences

Using the Internet as a source of information about patients’ experiences

Chapter:
(p.94) Chapter 10 Using the Internet as a source of information about patients’ experiences
Source:
Understanding and Using Health Experiences
Author(s):

Fadhila Mazanderani

John Powell

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199665372.003.0010

The internet is playing an increasingly important role in the provision and production of health-related information and services. Experiences of health and illness exist in a variety of online settings and media formats including forums, blogs, videos, social-networks, patient opinion and ratings sites. This chapter outlines some of the ways in which this online content can be used as a resource for exploring patients’ experiences. We illustrate this with examples of previous work in this area. While the internet affords many opportunities for researching experiences of health and illness, analysing online content also raises a number of challenges, including ethical issues, and these are also discussed. In the conclusion, we provide an overview of future prospects and areas of opportunity in this emerging and fast moving area of research.

Keywords:   Internet, content analysis, experiences, health, illness, ethics, methods

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