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Making NewsThe Political Economy of Journalism in Britain and America from the Glorious Revolution to the Internet$
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Richard R. John and Jonathan Silberstein-Loeb

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780199676187

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2015

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199676187.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 27 November 2021

The Rise of the Newspaper

The Rise of the Newspaper

Chapter:
(p.19) 2 The Rise of the Newspaper
Source:
Making News
Author(s):

Will Slauter

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199676187.003.0002

This chapter charts changes in the business of news in England and its North American colonies from the early seventeenth century through 1775. Contending that the “rise of the newspaper” was not inevitable, it discusses a variety of news publications, from handwritten newsletters and broadside ballads to printed newspapers and magazines. The chapter explains how writers, editors, and printers of news adapted to changes in postal distribution and press regulations—including censorship and taxation. By locating editorial conventions and business strategies in their historical context, it reveals how the newspaper became the primary medium for packaging and distributing news during the eighteenth century.

Keywords:   newsletters, newspapers, pamphlets, magazines, censorship, press regulations, postal distribution, England, colonial America

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