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Cosmopolitanism versus Non-CosmopolitanismCritiques, Defenses, Reconceptualizations$
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Gillian Brock

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780199678426

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2013

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199678426.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 27 November 2021

Worldly Citizens: Civic Virtue Without Patriotism

Worldly Citizens: Civic Virtue Without Patriotism

Chapter:
(p.239) 12 Worldly Citizens: Civic Virtue Without Patriotism
Source:
Cosmopolitanism versus Non-Cosmopolitanism
Author(s):

Simon Keller

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199678426.003.0012

Are patriots better citizens? Many argue that they are, and that this is a reason to encourage patriotism. This chapter compares patriotic citizenship with “worldly citizenship,” which is modeled on the patterns of loyalty exhibited by people who leave their native countries and become good citizens of new countries. In contrast with the patriot, the worldly citizen has attachments to entities within the country, rather than to the country itself; and she experiences the country not as a component of her identity, but as one country among many. The chapter argues that the worldly citizen is likely to be a better citizen than the patriot, and that worldly citizenship is no less achievable than patriotic citizenship. The chapter concludes that there is no good argument from civic virtue to patriotism, and connects worldly citizenship with a certain attractive understanding of cosmopolitanism.

Keywords:   patriotism, civic virtue, citizenship, loyalty, identity, cosmopolitanism

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