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Cosmopolitanism versus Non-CosmopolitanismCritiques, Defenses, Reconceptualizations$
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Gillian Brock

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780199678426

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2013

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199678426.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 27 November 2021

For (Some) Political and Institutional Cosmopolitanism, (even if) Against Moral Cosmopolitanism

For (Some) Political and Institutional Cosmopolitanism, (even if) Against Moral Cosmopolitanism

Chapter:
(p.156) 8 For (Some) Political and Institutional Cosmopolitanism, (even if) Against Moral Cosmopolitanism
Source:
Cosmopolitanism versus Non-Cosmopolitanism
Author(s):

Miriam Ronzoni

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199678426.003.0008

This chapter proposes to distinguish between three levels of cosmopolitanism: moral, political, and institutional. Moral cosmopolitans believe that a distinctively rich package of our obligations of justice is global in scope due to basic moral reasons (such as our common humanity and the equal moral worth of all persons). Political cosmopolitans argue that emancipatory political action must be largely global in character and reach. Institutional cosmopolitans assert the need to establish global institutions. The chapter offers a conceptual exploration of how these three cosmopolitan layers can be differently combined, and argues that some of these combinations are not as obvious as one might think. In particular, I contend that, under current political circumstances, even those who oppose moral cosmopolitanism must buy into a certain degree of both political and institutional cosmopolitanism. The chapter ends with some reflections on the nature of the duty to establish not yet existing institutions.

Keywords:   moral cosmopolitanism, political cosmopolitanism, institutional cosmopolitanism, global political movements, background justice, (perfect and imperfect) duties

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