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Marriage and the British Army in the Long Eighteenth Century – 'The Girl I Left Behind Me' - Oxford Scholarship Online
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Marriage and the British Army in the Long Eighteenth Century: 'The Girl I Left Behind Me'

Jennine Hurl-Eamon

Abstract

Marriage and the British Army in the Long Eighteenth Century addresses a neglected aspect of the history of the Hanoverian army. From 1685 to the start of the Victorian era, army administration attempted to discourage marriage among men in almost all ranks. It fostered a misogynist culture of the bachelor soldier who trifled with feminine hearts and avoided responsibility and commitment. This policy was unsuccessful in preventing military marriage. By concentrating on the many soldiers’ wives who were unable to win permission to live ‘on the strength’ of the regiment (entitled to ... More

Keywords: Hanoverian army, anti-marriage policy, ballads, duty, Enlightenment femininity, military marriage, regimental community

Bibliographic Information

Print publication date: 2014 Print ISBN-13: 9780199681006
Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: April 2014 DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199681006.001.0001

Authors

Affiliations are at time of print publication.

Jennine Hurl-Eamon, author
Associate Professor of History, Trent University