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Rome's Economic Revolution$
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Philip Kay

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780199681549

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: April 2014

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199681549.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 07 December 2021

Indemnities and Booty

Indemnities and Booty

Chapter:
(p.20) (p.21) 2 Indemnities and Booty
Source:
Rome's Economic Revolution
Author(s):

Philip Kay

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199681549.003.0003

From the beginning of the second century bc, vast quantities of bullion came to Rome in the form of war booty and indemnities from most of its defeated enemies, notably Carthage, Macedonia, and Syria. We have relatively precise (if not always accurate) figures from literary sources for war indemnities. Booty is more difficult to quantify, as the record is incomplete, but our sources also suggest significant inflows. It would appear that from warfare alone, Rome received more than 45,000 talents over a fifty-year period. The most immediate and direct beneficiaries of these inflows of capital were Rome’s military forces themselves, as is indicated by the high proportion of revenue that was spent on this area. At the same time, there was also a strong link between income from warfare and the increased wealth of certain members of the elite, in particular of military commanders.

Keywords:   bullion, war, booty, indemnities, military, elite, silver, Carthage, Macedonia, Syria

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