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The Future of BioethicsInternational Dialogues$
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Akira Akabayashi

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780199682676

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2014

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199682676.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 24 October 2021

Primary Topic Article

Primary Topic Article

Informed Consent Revisited: A Global Perspective

Chapter:
(p.735) 21.1 Primary Topic Article
Source:
The Future of Bioethics
Author(s):

Akira Akabayashi

Yoshinori Hayashi

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199682676.003.0105

The question of informed consent and its true significance to patients, their families, and healthcare workers can often pose problems, particularly in cases involving poor diagnoses. In some situations, the previously proposed ‘family-facilitated’ approach to informed consent may be a more appropriate alternative to the ‘first-person’ approach. Here, the authors elaborate further on the characteristics and application of the family-facilitated approach, and present arguments that a family-facilitated approach does not counteract respect for patient autonomy. The authors conclude by describing a particularly flexible process at the core of the family-facilitated approach which attempts to reconcile in an unbiased manner apparently conflicting abstract ideals and local realities. The authors propose that when applied globally to different regions and cultures, this style of thinking may give rise to a way of thinking about informed consent that maintains respect for autonomy and cultural diversity.

Keywords:   Informed consent, family-facilitated approach, first-person approach, autonomy, cultural diversity

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