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The Future of BioethicsInternational Dialogues$
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Akira Akabayashi

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780199682676

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2014

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199682676.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 24 October 2021

Response to Commentaries

Response to Commentaries

The Real Force of ‘Procreative Beneficence’

Chapter:
(p.183) 4.6 Response to Commentaries
Source:
The Future of Bioethics
Author(s):

Robert Sparrow

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199682676.003.0021

In this paper the author responds to criticism of the article “Ethics, Eugenics and Politics” by Yasutaka Iachinokawa, Michelle McGowan, Gareth Jones, and Julian Savulescu. The author argues that none of these critics succeed in denying the key claim that the politics of the debate about human enhancement is more problematic than is usually acknowledged and transcends the intentions of those participating in it. However Savulescu’s response to the paper clarifies a number of important issues regarding the nature and force of “procreative beneficence”. Savulescu now concedes that in many circumstances there is no such thing as “the best child” and that procreative beneficence provides only “some reason” for parents to choose genes that would be likely to increase the welfare of their children.

Keywords:   Human enhancement, Savulescu, ethics, procreative beneficence

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