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The Future of BioethicsInternational Dialogues$
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Akira Akabayashi

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780199682676

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2014

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199682676.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 24 October 2021

Commentary

Commentary

Genetic Information: Direct to Consumers or Gatekeeping?

Chapter:
(p.292) 7.2 Commentary
Source:
The Future of Bioethics
Author(s):

Soraj Hongladarom

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199682676.003.0033

The author discusses Maschke’s preference of a pull approach in genetic testing and evaluates how this approach accommodates the principle of individual autonomy and privacy. Furthermore, the author touches upon the question of how individualized or personalized medicine would help or hinder equity of access to medical care--an issue the author believes to be more pressing in the developing world. In the context of poorer, developing countries, genetic technologies might be more useful if tailored to finding possible traits that occur throughout a population, rather than targeting individual differences or variations. Instead of promoting individually tailored medicine, a technology geared toward group-level customization should be developed, as this will go further towards reducing the inequality that still exists in the world today.

Keywords:   Genetic testing, direct-to-consumers, inequality, consumer choice, experts

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