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The Future of BioethicsInternational Dialogues$
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Akira Akabayashi

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780199682676

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2014

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199682676.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 24 October 2021

Commentary

Commentary

Can Living Donation Be Justified?

Chapter:
(p.461) 13.2 Commentary
Source:
The Future of Bioethics
Author(s):

Yohei Akaida

Kohji Ishihara

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199682676.003.0060

This commentary aims to examine Aulisio and Deming’s discussion of justification of living donation. First, this commentary compares living donor organ transplantation trends in the U.S. and Japan. In the second section, the authors examine Aulisio and Deming’s discussion on ethical concerns specific to each paradigm of living organ donation, giving reference to the situation and cases in Japan. In the last section, the authors address the ethical challenges posed by living donor organ transplantation itself. The authors then conclude that justification of living organ donation will remain an ethical challenge as long as living organ donation constitutes “prima facie harm” to donors, even if the donation system is improved in an ideal way.

Keywords:   Living donation, living donor organ transplantation in the U.S. and Japan, cadaveric transplantation, kidney transplantation, family relationship

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