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The Future of BioethicsInternational Dialogues$
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Akira Akabayashi

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780199682676

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2014

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199682676.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 28 October 2021

Response to Commentaries

Response to Commentaries

Sketch of a Virtue Ethics Regulatory Model

Chapter:
(p.697) 19.6 Response to Commentaries
Source:
The Future of Bioethics
Author(s):

Justin Oakley

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199682676.003.0098

The author here elaborates on how a virtue ethics regulatory model might combat medical conflicts of interest. The author explains how, in evaluating a certain regulatory intervention here, such a model could investigate the impact which such an initiative may have had on doctors’ prioritising of patients’ best interests over other considerations in their prescribing decisions, in other, comparable sorts of cases, such as pay-for-performance schemes. The author also indicates how a virtue ethics policy approach in this context could examine what policymakers can do to help professional associations in medicine meet their avowed goals of preserving the therapeutic orientation of doctor-patient relationships, at a time of an increasing commercialization of medical practice. In doing so, The author hopes to show how virtue ethics can play an important role in helping to devise effective and well-targeted regulatory solutions to such problems.

Keywords:   Virtue ethics, regulation, conflicts of interest, physician prescribing, doctor-patient relationships, professional virtue

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