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RealpoetikEuropean Romanticism and Literary Politics$
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Paul Hamilton

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780199686179

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2014

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199686179.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 18 September 2021

Resourcing Philosophy: Schelling’s Figurative Materialism

Resourcing Philosophy: Schelling’s Figurative Materialism

Chapter:
(p.165) 7 Resourcing Philosophy: Schelling’s Figurative Materialism
Source:
Realpoetik
Author(s):

Paul Hamilton

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199686179.003.0008

Schelling provide the metaphysics for the Realpoetik examined throughout the book. Throughout his career he continues to re-phrase his sense that philosophy cannot describe material reality literally and so has to refigure its project in different discourses, delegating its authority successively to aesthetic, theological and mythological expression. The entirely unconditioned, unconscious character which these expressions are philosophically licenced to figure, the real they get at poetically, is an eternal lack in Being which could contain the counter-purposive force Leopardi was convinced drove everything. Schelling’s confrontation with the ultimate freedom behind everything is traced from his early writings onwards through his Freedom Essay (Freiheitsschrift) and Ages of the World (Weltalter) to the last lectures. His exploration of the dark side is shown to give the most definitive version of a defining anxiety of German philosophy after Jena,

Keywords:   Unconscious, love, freedom, lack, psychoanalysis, post-Kantianism, Marxism

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