Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Genetics of Psychological Well-BeingThe role of heritability and genetics in positive psychology$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Michael Pluess

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780199686674

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: August 2015

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199686674.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 16 October 2021

Genes, environment, and psychological well-being

Genes, environment, and psychological well-being

Chapter:
(p.251) Chapter 15 Genes, environment, and psychological well-being
Source:
Genetics of Psychological Well-Being
Author(s):

Michael Pluess

Michael J. Meaney

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199686674.003.0015

The field of psychology has a long history of debating to what degree psychological traits are determined by genetic predispositions versus environmental factors. According to quantitative behavioral genetics studies, psychological well-being has a significant heritable genetic component. However, environmental factors consistently tend to explain more variance than genetic ones. While these findings imply that genes and environment have independent and distinctly quantifiable effects, a biological perspective suggests that any developmental outcome is the function of the dynamic and bidirectional interplay between genetic and environmental factors. This view is supported by recent molecular genetics studies on gene–environment interaction and epigenetics. Consequently, psychological well-being reflects the combined additive and multiplicative effect of multiple factors, including genes, environment, their interaction, as well as stochastic processes. Given this complex relationship between genes and environment, current methods and approaches are not yet able to precisely disentangle genetic and environmental contributions to psychological well-being.

Keywords:   psychological well-being, behavioral genetics, molecular genetics, gene–environment interaction, epigenetics, stochastic processes

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .