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The Oxford Companion to the Economics of South Africa$
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Haroon Bhorat, Alan Hirsch, Ravi Kanbur, and Mthuli Ncube

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780199689248

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2015

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199689248.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2022. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use.date: 06 July 2022

Electricity supply

Electricity supply

Chapter:
(p.223) 27 Electricity supply
Source:
The Oxford Companion to the Economics of South Africa
Author(s):

Anton Eberhard

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199689248.003.0028

The chapter focuses on the Buddhist artistic expression of the First Jebtsundamba Khutugtu (1635–1723), one of the most celebrated persons in the history of Mongolian Buddhism, who is believed to have single-handedly brought the tradition of Vajray›na Buddhism to late medieval Mongolia. Buddhist rituals, texts, temple construction, Buddhist art, and even designs for monastic robes are all attributed to his genius. He also introduced the artistic forms of Buddhist deities to Mongolia, such as the Five Tath›gatas, Maitreya, Twenty-One T›r›s, Vajradhara, Vajrasattva, and others. His careful selection of these deities, their particular forms, and the way in which they are represented demonstrate his unique artistic conventions. Zanabazar is also credited with building his main Buddhist settlement Urga (known later as Ikh Khüree, and today Ulaanbaatar), a mobile camp that was to reach out to the nomadic communities in various areas of Mongolia and spread Buddhism among them.

Keywords:   Zanabazar, the First Jebtsundamba Khutughtu, Urga, Ikh Khüree, Five Tath›gatas, Maitreya, Twenty-One T›r›s, Vajradhara, Vajrasattva

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