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Garden of the WorldAsian Immigrants and the Making of Agriculture in California's Santa Clara Valley$
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Cecilia M. Tsu

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780199734771

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2013

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199734771.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2022. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use.date: 17 May 2022

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Transplanted

The World of Early Issei Farmers

Chapter:
(p.53) 2 Transplanted
Source:
Garden of the World
Author(s):

Cecilia M. Tsu

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199734771.003.0003

Focusing on the arrival of the first Japanese immigrants in the Santa Clara Valley at the turn of the twentieth century, this chapter takes up their establishment in agriculture and shows how they quickly entered economic niches already established by Chinese farmers and farm laborers. While white promoters and settlers placed a higher cultural premium on orchard fruit growing, setting it apart from the variety of horticultural production in the region and envisioning a labor system divided along the lines of race, gender, and crop, the Japanese, like their Chinese counterparts, engaged in all types of horticulture and were essential to the Valley's agricultural landscape. In the period of transition from Chinese to Japanese labor, interethnic relations flourished as well, reflecting the presence of an ethnic economy in the Valley that was not wholly dependent on whites.

Keywords:   Japanese immigrants, agriculture, labor, Chinese immigrants, interethnic relations

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