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Policing the Roman EmpireSoldiers, Administration, and Public Order$
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Christopher Fuhrmann

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780199737840

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199737840.001.0001

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“Keep your province pacified and quiet”: Provincial Governors, Public Order, and Policing

“Keep your province pacified and quiet”: Provincial Governors, Public Order, and Policing

Chapter:
(p.170) (p.171) 7 “Keep your province pacified and quiet”: Provincial Governors, Public Order, and Policing
Source:
Policing the Roman Empire
Author(s):

Christopher J. Fuhrmann

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199737840.003.0007

An appreciation of the Roman governor's position and responsibilities shows that he was the most important figure in provincial law and order; good governors clearly took an interest in protecting people and fighting crime, often using soldiers on their staff (officium) to do so. At the same time, complicated local politics, corruption, and other considerations constrained governors’ actual power. Many aspects of the governors’ role also apply to imperial procurators, whose importance in the provinces is hard to exaggerate. Particularly telling is an inscription from Asia Minor, Frend JRS 46 (1956), which reveals how successive procurators of an imperial estate managed a protracted conflict between two villages, partly by employing soldiers at their disposal as police.

Keywords:   provincial governors, local politics, corruption, Dio Chrysostom, crime, officium, imperial procurators

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