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Hating GodThe Untold Story of Misotheism$
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Bernard Schweizer

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780199751389

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199751389.001.0001

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Absolute Misotheism III

Absolute Misotheism III

Anticlericalism, Deicide, and Philip Pullman’s Liberal Crusade Against God

Chapter:
(p.193) Absolute Misotheism III
Source:
Hating God
Author(s):

Bernard Schweizer

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199751389.003.0007

This chapter discusses a contemporary manifestation of misotheism, and it documents the moment when misotheism is at the threshold of entering the cultural mainstream. In Pullman’s celebrated trilogy, His Dark Materials, a band of children and adults set out to make war on God (called the Authority in the trilogy) and not only do they succeed, but they do so while implementing a progressive, liberal set of values. The story goes beyond an anticlerical focus on the wrongdoings of the Church to suggest the need to do away with the patently incompetent, deceptive, and tyrannical deity altogether. This chapter reflects on the contemporary reception of Pullman’s work (including the movie “The Golden Compass”) in the U.S., and it shows how discussions of Pullman’s religious attitudes are derailed by a lack of awareness about his misotheistic stance.

Keywords:   absolute misotheism, deicide, panentheism, atheism, anticlericalism, His Dark Materials, John Milton, William Blake, Philip Pullman, liberal humanism

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