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Social Marketing Research for Global Public HealthMethods and Technologies$
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W. Douglas Evans

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780199757398

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: August 2016

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199757398.001.0001

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Lessons Learned and Future Social Marketing Research

Lessons Learned and Future Social Marketing Research

Chapter:
(p.273) 10 Lessons Learned and Future Social Marketing Research
Source:
Social Marketing Research for Global Public Health
Author(s):

W. Douglas Evans

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199757398.003.0010

Social marketing research is growing along with theory and practice in the field. This book identifies best practices and innovations in social marketing research. New methods and technologies can fill important gaps in the evidence. Translational research is a critical part and major purpose of social marketing but is often lacking. There are challenges in terms of closing the loop of research into practice as described in the PRECEDE-PROCEED and other translational research models. Strategic use of the social marketing research approach should be a priority for social and behavior change programs generally, and renewed efforts to build knowledge, education, and skills in the use of research for this purpose are an urgent priority for the field as a whole. More research on how best to diffuse social marketing methods into practice and how to close the research-practice loop is needed.

Keywords:   translation research, PRECEDE-PROCEED, engaging participants, user-generated content, social media, video narrative storytelling, comorbid conditions, diffusion of research methods, research-to-practice gap

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