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Activation or Workfare? Governance and the Neo-Liberal Convergence$
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Ivar Lodemel and Amilcar Moreira

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780199773589

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: December 2014

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199773589.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 28 October 2021

Governing Activation in the 21st Century

Governing Activation in the 21st Century

A (Hi)Story of Change

Chapter:
(p.289) 11 Governing Activation in the 21st Century
Source:
Activation or Workfare? Governance and the Neo-Liberal Convergence
Author(s):
Amílcar Moreira

Ivar Lødemel

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199773589.003.0011

The chapter identifies two main trends in the changing governance of activation. The first concerns the strengthening of the role of the market in the governance of activation—which is the product, on the one side, of the gradual withdrawal of the state from its regulatory function and, on the other side, of the increased adoption of market-like mechanisms by the State. The second trend concerns the strengthening of efforts to adjust the delivery of activation services to the needs and characteristics of minimum income recipients—the individualization of service delivery. The chapter then identifies two groups of countries: “marketizers” (United Kingdom, France, Czech Republic, the Netherlands), where reforms signify a clear strengthening of the role of the market in the governance of activation, and “comprehensive reformers” (Germany, Denmark), where the strengthening of the role of the market was accompanied by a drive toward individualization.

Keywords:   activation, minimum income, governance, reform, market, state, individualization, Europe, United States, comparative policy analysis

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