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The Oxford Compendium of Visual Illusions$
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Arthur G. Shapiro and Dejan Todorovic

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780199794607

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: June 2017

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199794607.001.0001

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Motion-Induced Blindness

Motion-Induced Blindness

Chapter:
(p.709) Chapter 103 Motion-Induced Blindness
Source:
The Oxford Compendium of Visual Illusions
Author(s):

Yoram Bonneh

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199794607.003.0103

Motion-induced blindness (MIB) is a phenomenon characterized by “visual disappearance” in which relatively small but salient visual objects may disappear from one’s awareness intermittently for several seconds when embedded within a moving pattern. It is a compelling example of multistable perception in which physically invariant stimulation leads to fluctuations in perception. The interest in MIB stems from its potential use in studying visual processing outside the locus of awareness and the neural correlates of consciousness. Current studies of MIB provide evidence against low-level suppression of the visual signal and demonstrate residual processing of the invisible. This chapter explores these and related concepts.

Keywords:   motion-induced blindness, MIB, visual disappearance, perception, visual signal

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