Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
The Oxford Compendium of Visual Illusions$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Arthur G. Shapiro and Dejan Todorovic

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780199794607

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: June 2017

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199794607.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 06 August 2020

Two-Stroke Apparent Motion

Two-Stroke Apparent Motion

Chapter:
(p.531) Chapter 73 Two-Stroke Apparent Motion
Source:
The Oxford Compendium of Visual Illusions
Author(s):

George Mather

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199794607.003.0073

“Two-stroke” apparent motion is a powerful illusion of directional motion generated by alternating just two animation frames, which occurs when a brief blank interframe interval is inserted at alternate frame transitions. This chapter discusses this illusion, which can be explained in terms of the receptive field properties of motion-sensing neurons in the human visual system. The temporal response of these neurons contains both an excitatory phase and an inhibitory phase; when the timing of the interframe interval just matches the switch in response sign, the illusion occurs. Concepts covered in this chapter include four-stroke as well as two-stroke apparent motion, motion aftereffect, and motion detection.

Keywords:   four-stroke apparent motion, two-stroke apparent motion, motion aftereffect, motion detector

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .