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The Oxford Compendium of Visual Illusions$
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Arthur G. Shapiro and Dejan Todorovic

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780199794607

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: June 2017

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199794607.001.0001

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Color Wagon-Wheel Illusion

Color Wagon-Wheel Illusion

Chapter:
(p.548) Chapter 75 Color Wagon-Wheel Illusion
Source:
The Oxford Compendium of Visual Illusions
Author(s):

Arthur G. Shapiro

William Kistler

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199794607.003.0075

The wagon-wheel illusion is a well-known cinematic effect in which a wheel rotates in one direction but is perceived as rotating in the opposite direction. This effect is created by the limitations of the frame rate at which the motion is sampled. This chapter examines variants of the color wagon-wheel illusion, an effect that arises when one or more elements of the rotating wagon wheel is colored or otherwise distinguished from other elements. In the color wagon-wheel illusion, the wheel is overall perceived as moving counterclockwise, but the colored elements are perceived as moving clockwise. The chapter explores equiluminant versions of the color wagon-wheel effect to show that separable motion directions can be used to tap into different types of motion perception systems.

Keywords:   motion, wagon-wheel illusion, equiluminance, color, illusions

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