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The Oxford Compendium of Visual Illusions$
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Arthur G. Shapiro and Dejan Todorovic

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780199794607

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: June 2017

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199794607.001.0001

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The Motion Standstill Illusion

The Motion Standstill Illusion

Chapter:
(p.569) Chapter 78 The Motion Standstill Illusion
Source:
The Oxford Compendium of Visual Illusions
Author(s):

George Sperling

Son-Hee Lyu

Chia-Huei Tseng

Zhong-Lin Lu

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199794607.003.0078

In the motion standstill illusion, a pattern that is moving quite rapidly is perceived as being absolutely motionless, and yet its details are not blurred but clearly visible. The illusion can be observed in a wide variety of special moving stimuli that either disadvantage or fatigue the motion systems to the point where no motion is perceived but where the shape, texture, color, and depth systems are still able to function sufficiently to extract a stable image from the moving display. It demonstrates that visual processing systems for attributes such as shape, texture, color, and depth extract stable representations from moving images; only visual motion systems are capable of producing the sensation of motion.

Keywords:   motion standstill illusion, shape, texture, color, depth, stable representations, visual motion systems

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