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Stress, Trauma, and Wellbeing in the Legal System$
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Monica K. Miller and Brian H. Bornstein

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780199829996

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2013

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199829996.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 07 December 2021

Stressors Experienced by State and Federal Probation Officers

Stressors Experienced by State and Federal Probation Officers

Chapter:
(p.197) 9 Stressors Experienced by State and Federal Probation Officers
Source:
Stress, Trauma, and Wellbeing in the Legal System
Author(s):

Risdon N. Slate

W. Wesley Johnson

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199829996.003.0009

While there is a body of literature and research that focuses on the job of state probation officers, there is scant research on federal probation officers. This chapter reviews prior research on probation officers, then presents a pilot study that is among the first to compare the stressors experienced by state and federal probation officers. Differences in state and federal probation officers’ stressors are examined and discussed in reference to their role in a human service agency. Particular attention is given to how the nature of their work is related to their wellbeing and system functioning. Results indicate that state and federal probation officers do share some stressors, but also differ on the amount they experience other stressors. Limitations of the study are addressed, recommendations for future exploration are offered, and issues affecting management are discussed.

Keywords:   stress, trauma, wellbeing, courts, legal system, law enforcement, probation officers, innovations

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