Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Reconstructing the Cold WarThe Early Years, 1945-1958$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Ted Hopf

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780199858484

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199858484.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 20 October 2020

Stalin’s Foreign Policy

Stalin’s Foreign Policy

The Discourse of Danger Abroad, 1945–53

Chapter:
(p.72) 3 Stalin’s Foreign Policy
Source:
Reconstructing the Cold War
Author(s):

Ted Hopf

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199858484.003.0003

This chapter assesses the ability of societal constructivism to explain a host of Soviet relationships with the external world, which includes China, Eastern Europe, Yugoslavia, and the West. It is divided into two parts. The first deals with the period of relative Soviet tolerance of difference at home, reflected in a more tolerant foreign policy abroad. The second part reflects the triumph of the discourse of danger at home, and its projection onto Soviet relations with Eastern Europe, Yugoslavia, East Germany, China, the Third World, and the United States. Besides telling the story of these events based on the latest primary documentation available, it points out both the limits and rewards of paying attention to the elements of Soviet identity elaborated in Chapter 2.

Keywords:   societal constructivism, foreign relations, foreign policy, China, Eastern Europe, Yugoslavia, West, Soviet identity

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .