Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
The History and Future of BioethicsA Sociological View$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

John H. Evans

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780199860852

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199860852.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 28 July 2021

The Emergence of Bioethical Debate and the Jurisdictional Struggle Between Science and Theology

The Emergence of Bioethical Debate and the Jurisdictional Struggle Between Science and Theology

Chapter:
(p.2) (p.3) Chapter 1 The Emergence of Bioethical Debate and the Jurisdictional Struggle Between Science and Theology
Source:
The History and Future of Bioethics
Author(s):

John H. Evans

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199860852.003.0002

This chapter examines the origins of professional bioethical debate in the 1960s when scientists began to be concerned about the potential social implications of experiments in mind control, human genetic engineering, cloning, organ transplantation and other topics. The original debate in the first era was between scientists and theologians who were using secular translations of explicit theology. The debate was about the ends we as a society should pursue, and was thus a “thick” or “deep” debate. This first era was short lived as theologians soon made the theology implicit, resulting in the second era of debate. The core of the chapter shows the sociological forces that lead to this change, which laid the ground for the emergence of the bioethics profession.

Keywords:   bioethics, professions, theology, public debate, history

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .