Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Roman PalmyraIdentity, Community, and State Formation$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Andrew M. Smith II

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780199861101

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2013

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199861101.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 30 November 2021

Framing the Narrative

Framing the Narrative

Chapter:
(p.1) 1 Framing the Narrative
Source:
Roman Palmyra
Author(s):

Andrew M. Smith II

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199861101.003.0001

This chapter discusses the expression of Palmyrene identity, both in an individual and in a group sense, in inhabited space, as evident in archaeological remains, inscriptions, and literary sources. Two perspectives are offered. The first sees Palmyra as peripheral to the centers of Roman and Parthian power, yet more bound at the communal level by Roman authority and, however remotely, within Rome’s administrative reach. The second perspective views Palmyra as a center of its own network of power and influence, in which the Palmyrenes maintained an array of social, economic, political, and cultural relations with a host of “others” that shaped the city’s historical development and gave great distinctiveness to their individual and group identities. The discussions then turn to a framework for constructing Palmyrene identity and community; state formation at Roman Palmyra; literary sources about Roman Palmyra; and a summary of Palmyra’s history and urban development.

Keywords:   Roman Palmyra, palmyrene identity, Roman authority, group identity, community, state formation, urban development, history

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .