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Adult DevelopmentCognitive Aspects of Thriving Close Relationships$
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Jan D. Sinnott

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780199892815

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: August 2014

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199892815.001.0001

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Future Research that Includes Culture and History Effects

Future Research that Includes Culture and History Effects

Chapter:
(p.123) 9 Future Research that Includes Culture and History Effects
Source:
Adult Development
Author(s):

Jan D. Sinnott

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199892815.003.0009

Relationship satisfaction can be studied as part of multiple circular interactions having common cognitive and emotional interpretive processes. Understanding these in satisfying intimate relationships over time and across cultures can help us understand basic processes and antecedents of satisfaction. Cognition of relationships is important as it frames the behaviors that can be chosen during the relationship. Complex problem-solving operations that are part of postformal thought allow for the widest range of behaviors to be employed and offer freedom from rigid concepts of the other. Future studies should incorporate this awareness; future study topics are suggested.

Keywords:   relationship satisfaction, circular interaction, interpretive process, culture, history, research, cognition, problem-solving operations

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