Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
We’ll Have ManhattanThe Early Work of Rodgers & Hart$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Dominic Symonds

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780199929481

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2015

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199929481.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2022. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use.date: 27 January 2022

Castration and Integration

Castration and Integration

Chee-Chee (1928)

Chapter:
(p.210) 8 Castration and Integration
Source:
We’ll Have Manhattan
Author(s):

Dominic Symonds

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199929481.003.0009

The least successful of Rodgers and Hart’s Broadway shows, Chee-Chee has always been considered a failure because of its topic. It’s based on the theme of castration, and in later years Rodgers dissociated himself from what he saw as an unsavory mistake. In fact, the show is more distasteful in its treatment of women as sexual commodities. Yet Chee-Chee is particularly interesting for its experimental development in the integrated musical. This chapter explores the innovative writing of the show as an important stage in the development of the form. But the show’s short run can also be attributed to other influences beyond its theme. Authorities were cracking down on immoral subject matter on Broadway because of the Wales Padlock Law, and this may have intimidated producer Lew Fields. The chapter considers the demise of Chee-Chee in the light of contextual events, discussing in particular the perceived threat of homosexuality, and Lorenz Hart’s self-identity as gay.

Keywords:   Herbert Fields, Lew Fields, Chee-Chee, homosexuality, castration, Wales Padlock Law, integrated musical

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .