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Africa in StereoModernism, Music, and Pan-African Solidarity$
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Tsitsi Ella Jaji

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780199936373

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: April 2014

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199936373.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 07 March 2021

Epilogue

Epilogue

Singing Stones

Chapter:
(p.238) (p.239) Epilogue
Source:
Africa in Stereo
Author(s):

Tsitsi Ella Jaji

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199936373.003.0007

Returning to the concerns first raised in the introduction, the epilogue considers both the limits of pan-Africanism in a manifestly divided and precarious continent, and its still-resonant potentiality. Through a discussion of Keorapetse Kgositsile’s most recent poetry, which confronts such post-1994 challenges as xenophobic anti-immigrant violence in South Africa, but also the double-speak of diplomatic language, this epilogue notes the important critical work that literary and other artistic expression can do to highlight the ethical imperatives of solidarity, and the dangers inherent in forms of identification that disregard the right to difference, opacity, or stereophony. The chapter concludes with a meditation on the ancient Egyptian statue of Memnon, and its capacities for resonance through fractured stone, as an enduring parable of the productive possibilities of solidarity amongst differences.

Keywords:   Memnon, Kgositsile, resonance, Zimbabwe, stereo, echo

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