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The Language of Bribery Cases$
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Roger W. Shuy

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780199945139

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2014

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199945139.001.0001

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Introduction to the language of bribery

Introduction to the language of bribery

Chapter:
(p.2) (p.3) [1] Introduction to the language of bribery
Source:
The Language of Bribery Cases
Author(s):

Roger W. Shuy

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199945139.003.0001

This chapter describes one of the serious problems faced by both prosecutors and defense attorneys in bribery cases—attending only to part of the language evidence (often the smoking gun) rather than seeing small language parts within the whole language context. Introduced here are the linguistic tools and procedures that can help clarify crucial passages in bribery cases—the speech events, schemas, speech acts, agendas, conversational strategies, and phonological, grammatical and semantic issues that are easily overlooked without an expert linguist’s assistance. Twelve actual bribery cases include examples of crystal clear bribery events, camouflaged bribery events, rejected bribery offers, entrapment, bungled rejection of bribery offers, coded bribery offers, and manipulated bribery attempts.

Keywords:   part vs. whole, context, linguistic tools, inverted pyramid sequence, smoking gun passages

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