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The Language of Bribery Cases$
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Roger W. Shuy

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780199945139

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2014

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199945139.001.0001

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The bungled rejection of a bribery event by Nevada brothel commissioners John Poli and John McNown

The bungled rejection of a bribery event by Nevada brothel commissioners John Poli and John McNown

Chapter:
(p.169) [10] The bungled rejection of a bribery event by Nevada brothel commissioners John Poli and John McNown
Source:
The Language of Bribery Cases
Author(s):

Roger W. Shuy

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199945139.003.0010

Fearing that a madam requesting a brothel license was actually from the mob, the commissioners naively thought that they could clarify this by asking her for a bribe. Their meeting was an unusual bribery speech event in which the alleged bribees were testing the water but didn’t plan to take any money. Citations of the confused meeting illustrate that the men said they would not accept her offer of a bribe. Even though they said “no,” the FBI thought the men had agreed to take the money when she left in on a chair as they left the dinner where they met. The language evidence of the conflicting schemas, agendas, and speech acts as well as the government’s badly transcribed transcript demonstrated the exact opposite of what the government claimed.

Keywords:   speech event phases, transcript errors, schemas, agendas, speech acts, conversational strategies, smoking guns

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