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Chinese Syntax in a Cross-Linguistic Perspective$
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Audrey Li, Andrew Simpson, and Wei-Tien Dylan Tsai

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780199945658

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: November 2014

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199945658.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 31 July 2021

On the Internal Structure of Comparative Constructions:

On the Internal Structure of Comparative Constructions:

From Chinese and Japanese to English

Chapter:
(p.334) 13 On the Internal Structure of Comparative Constructions:
Source:
Chinese Syntax in a Cross-Linguistic Perspective
Author(s):

Yang Gu

Jie Guo

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199945658.003.0013

In this chapter a unified structure is proposed for comparatives of superiority and comparatives of equality in Chinese. The comparee and the standard of the comparative construction assume a complex DP structure headed by a comitative. The structure captures semantic and syntactic parallelism of individual comparison as a parametric mode of comparatives by means of Chinese. Through an examination of Japanese attributive comparatives, it is argued that the two languages are similarly parameterized into individual comparison, thereby accounting for the lack of sub-comparatives and negative island effects seen in English comparatives.

Keywords:   comparative constructions, comitatives, individual comparison, sub-comparatives, Chinese, Japanese

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