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Chinese Syntax in a Cross-Linguistic Perspective$
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Audrey Li, Andrew Simpson, and Wei-Tien Dylan Tsai

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780199945658

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: November 2014

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199945658.001.0001

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The same Difference: Comparative Syntax-Semantics of English same and Chinese tong/xiang-tong

The same Difference: Comparative Syntax-Semantics of English same and Chinese tong/xiang-tong

Chapter:
(p.128) 5 The same Difference: Comparative Syntax-Semantics of English same and Chinese tong/xiang-tong
Source:
Chinese Syntax in a Cross-Linguistic Perspective
Author(s):

Wei-wen Roger Liao

Yuyun Wang

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199945658.003.0005

The syntax-semantic properties of the element ‘same’ in English and Chinese are examined and compared. This chapter argues that the apparent adjective ‘same’ is not always an NP-modifier in Chinese or in English, and it may occur in different functional categories in the nominal domain, and may map systematically to semantic type-token distinctions of ‘same.’ Adopting recent proposals in Kayne (2005) and Leu (2008), the chapter provides a unified analysis of ‘same’ in English and Chinese, arguing that token-denoting ‘same’ forms a syntactic complex with the determiner in English as well as in Chinese. The chapter thus concludes that ‘same’ in Chinese entails the presence of a covert determiner in Chinese, which lends support to the universal DP-analysis (Borer 2005; Li 1999; Simpson 2005; Tang 1990).

Keywords:   type-token distinction, DP-analysis, syntax, NP-modifier, Chinese

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