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Sampling Media$
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David Laderman and Laurel Westrup

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780199949311

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: April 2014

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199949311.001.0001

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All Work and No Play

All Work and No Play

Trailer Park, the Mash-Up, and Industrial Pedagogies

Chapter:
(p.184) (p.185) 13 All Work and No Play
Source:
Sampling Media
Author(s):

Jonathan Cohn

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199949311.003.0014

This chapter looks at how the contemporary conception of the digital mash-up became both a recognizable and acceptable part of mainstream media through its early use as a pedagogical tool for commercial editors. One of the most widely known examples of this genre is Robert Ryang’s “Shining,” which used creative editing, a new voice-over, and a rather peppy Peter Gabriel song to transform Kubrick’s thriller into a feel-good father-son melodrama. Ryang’s mash-up was made for a contest held by the Association of Independent Creative Editors, which represents commercial editors. This chapter argues that it is this original context of commercial industrial pedagogy that made it possible for this piece and the mash-up genre as a whole to be hailed by a wider public interested in both its pedagogical and artistic potentials. In the process, the chapter challenges the oppositions that are often made between mainstream “professional” productions and “amateur” mash-ups.

Keywords:   Association of Independent Creative Editors (AICE), Robert Ryang, "Shining", mash-up, neoliberal, fair use, Trailer Park, Camp Kuleshov, media industries, production culture

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