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Ancestral Landscapes in Human EvolutionCulture, Childrearing and Social Wellbeing$
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Darcia Narvaez, Kristin Valentino, Agustin Fuentes, James J. McKenna, and Peter Gray

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780199964253

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: April 2014

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199964253.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 30 July 2021

Importance of the Developmental Perspective in Evolutionary Discussions of Post-traumatic Stress Disorder

Importance of the Developmental Perspective in Evolutionary Discussions of Post-traumatic Stress Disorder

Chapter:
(p.286) 12 Importance of the Developmental Perspective in Evolutionary Discussions of Post-traumatic Stress Disorder
Source:
Ancestral Landscapes in Human Evolution
Author(s):

Robyn Bluhm

Ruth A. Lanius

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199964253.003.0021

Although an evolutionary theory has been suggested for mental disorders and PTSD, it is lacking the developmental aspect that is essential for understanding their etiologies. The current volume focuses on the types of caregiving practices that evolved over the course of human evolution. In order to delineate optimal and suboptimal contexts for human development, it may be helpful to link parenting and practices and neural development. This chapter focuses here on emerging research on the neurological effects of childhood abuse that results in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). This research suggests that abuse profoundly affects neural (and therefore psychological) development. The chapter also addresses the implications of this research for evolutionary accounts of PTSD, which do not take the effects of early childhood experience into account.

Keywords:   PTSD, evolution, emotion regulation, development, childhood abuse

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