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Early Literacy Development in Deaf Children$
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Connie Mayer and Beverly J. Trezek

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780199965694

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: November 2015

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199965694.001.0001

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Early Writing

Early Writing

Chapter:
(p.91) 4 Early Writing
Source:
Early Literacy Development in Deaf Children
Author(s):

Connie Mayer

Beverly J. Trezek

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199965694.003.0004

The focus in this chapter is on early writing development, an area that has received relatively less research attention than reading in the literature on both hearing and deaf early literacy learners. The view is taken that learning to write is a developmental process in which all children must come to see that text is a representation of spoken language, an understanding that is achieved by uncovering/discovering the systematic and arbitrary relationships in which the spoken language is encoded in the orthographic system of the language to be written. The argument is made that this process for hearing and deaf children depends on both language-related and code- related abilities, with examples from both groups of writers used to illustrate the stages of early writing development and what needs to be mastered at each stage.

Keywords:   early literacy, deaf, writing, language, invented spelling

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