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Counting Civilian CasualtiesAn Introduction to Recording and Estimating Nonmilitary Deaths in Conflict$
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Taylor B. Seybolt, Jay D. Aronson, and Baruch Fischhoff

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780199977307

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2013

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199977307.001.0001

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A Review of Estimation Methods for Victims of the Bosnian War and the Khmer Rouge Regime

A Review of Estimation Methods for Victims of the Bosnian War and the Khmer Rouge Regime

Chapter:
(p.213) 11 A Review of Estimation Methods for Victims of the Bosnian War and the Khmer Rouge Regime
Source:
Counting Civilian Casualties
Author(s):

Ewa Tabeau

Jan Zwierzchowski

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199977307.003.0011

This chapter presents an overview of the methods and sources used in victim estimation for the conflicts in Bosnia and Herzegovina and Cambodia and discusses major reasons for differences among the existing estimates. The 2010 estimate of the BH death toll produced under the auspices of the United Nations International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia is discussed. Suggestions for selecting the most reliable methods are offered and justified. For low-death-toll conflicts and countries with good availability of individual level sources on war deaths, such as Bosnia, empirical counting combined with (MSE) undercount estimation is very reliable. Extrapolation of random samples is less reliable owing to massive and complex population movements. For high-death-toll conflicts and countries like Cambodia under the Khmer Rouge, where statistical sources on the population are dramatically lacking, the best approach must always be proposed based on realities of the particular conflict studied.

Keywords:   death tolls, war deaths, victim estimation, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Cambodia, Khmer Rouge

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