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Counting Civilian CasualtiesAn Introduction to Recording and Estimating Nonmilitary Deaths in Conflict$
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Taylor B. Seybolt, Jay D. Aronson, and Baruch Fischhoff

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780199977307

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2013

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199977307.001.0001

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Challenges to Counting and Classifying Victims of Violence in Conflict, Post-Conflict, and Non-Conflict Settings

Challenges to Counting and Classifying Victims of Violence in Conflict, Post-Conflict, and Non-Conflict Settings

Chapter:
(p.265) 13 Challenges to Counting and Classifying Victims of Violence in Conflict, Post-Conflict, and Non-Conflict Settings
Source:
Counting Civilian Casualties
Author(s):

Keith Krause

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199977307.003.0013

Although improvements in the evidence base for analyzing armed violence are a positive development, critical exclusions and limitations to what and who is counted and how they are counted pose serious challenges to the development of conflict resolution and violence reduction policies and programs. This chapter reviews the “state of the art” of various approaches to counting casualties and presents the rationale for an integrated approach to counting victims of violence that effaces the boundary between so-called conflict deaths and non-conflict deaths of victims of armed violence. It also considers methodology, examining the technical and conceptual obstacles to achieving a more integrated approach to civilian casualty counting. The chapter concludes by focusing on some of the more philosophical challenges to counting casualties “in the field” and to developing appropriate violence prevention and reduction policies.

Keywords:   conflict deaths, non-conflict deaths, civilian casualty counting, armed violence, methodology

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