Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Counting Civilian CasualtiesAn Introduction to Recording and Estimating Nonmilitary Deaths in Conflict$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Taylor B. Seybolt, Jay D. Aronson, and Baruch Fischhoff

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780199977307

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2013

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199977307.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 27 October 2020

Iraqi Body Count

Iraqi Body Count

A Case Study in the Uses of Incident-Based Conflict Casualty Data

Chapter:
(p.53) 4 Iraqi Body Count
Source:
Counting Civilian Casualties
Author(s):

John Sloboda

Hamit Dardagan

Michael Spagat

Madelyn Hsiao-Rei Hicks

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199977307.003.0004

This chapter reviews the uses, merits, and limitations of incident-based casualty data, using the Iraq Body Count (IBC) database as an example. It outlines the characteristics, methods, and sources of IBC’s data. Examples are given of how data have been used to improve understanding of the effects of armed conflict on civilians, to commemorate individual deaths, and to advocate for civilian protection. The chapter discusses how IBC compares against other sources of information on violent deaths in Iraq, and assesses the strengths and limitations of using media-derived and incident-based data. It concludes by outlining improvements that could be made in the incident-based recording of civilian casualties in order to support better protection of civilians in armed conflict.

Keywords:   Iraq Body Count, civilian casualties, armed conflict, media-derived data, incident-based casualty reports

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .