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Making Sense of an Historic Landscape$
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Stephen Rippon

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780199533787

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2015

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:osobl/9780199533787.001.0001

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Discussion and conclusions: communities and their landscapes

Discussion and conclusions: communities and their landscapes

Chapter:
(p.315) 15 Discussion and conclusions: communities and their landscapes
Source:
Making Sense of an Historic Landscape
Author(s):

Stephen Rippon

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:osobl/9780199533787.003.0015

This chapter discusses how the marked regional variation in landscape character described in the preceding chapters came to be perpetuated throughout the historic period. It shows that for several millennia, the Blackdown Hills divided communities who chose to structure their landscape very differently, and while variations in the natural environment certainly played a part, they are not the whole explanation. Instead, it appears that there were deep-rooted differences in the nature of society either side of the Blackdown Hills that includes how social stratification was displayed, and the propensity for embracing change.

Keywords:   landscape character, historic landscapes, regional variation, Blackdown Hills, society, social stratification

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