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The Anatomy of PalmsArecaceae - Palmae$
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P. Barry Tomlinson, James W. Horn, and Jack B. Fisher

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780199558926

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2015

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:osobl/9780199558926.001.0001

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Subfamily Ceroxyloideae

Subfamily Ceroxyloideae

Chapter:
(p.170) Subfamily Ceroxyloideae
Source:
The Anatomy of Palms
Author(s):

P. Barry Tomlinson

James W. Horn

Jack B. Fisher

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:osobl/9780199558926.003.0013

The subfamily Ceroxyloideae exhibits an unusually large amount of structural diversity for a clade that contains but eight genera distributed among three tribes. Like its sister group Arecoideae, Ceroxyloideae are characterized by their reduplicate pinnate leaves and in having relatively inconspicuous bracts subtending the primary branches of the inflorescence. From both an anatomical and morphological perspective, Ceroxyloideae are without any unique synapomorphies. However, character analysis optimizes the presence of adaxial subepidermal fibres as a synapomorphy for the subfamily, with a subsequent loss of these fibres within Ceroxyleae. This chapter discusses the anatomical features of the tribes Cyclospatheae, Ceroxyleae, and Phytelepheae.

Keywords:   palms, tribal clades, anatomical features, vegetative anatomy, Cyclospatheae, Ceroxyleae, Phytelepheae, synapomorphies

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