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Atlantic Europe in the First Millennium BCCrossing the Divide$
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Tom Moore and Xosê-Lois Armada

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780199567959

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2015

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:osobl/9780199567959.001.0001

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Shifting Centres of Power and Changing Elite Symbolism in the Scheldt Fluvial Basin during the Late Bronze Age and the Iron Age

Shifting Centres of Power and Changing Elite Symbolism in the Scheldt Fluvial Basin during the Late Bronze Age and the Iron Age

Chapter:
(p.302) 13 Shifting Centres of Power and Changing Elite Symbolism in the Scheldt Fluvial Basin during the Late Bronze Age and the Iron Age
Source:
Atlantic Europe in the First Millennium BC
Author(s):

Guy De Mulder

Jean Bourgeois

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:osobl/9780199567959.003.0013

This chapter presents an overview of the changes in the centres of the regional elite groups in the Scheldt basin, based on information collected during the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries. From the late Bronze Age on, the Scheldt basin accommodated regional elite groups who displayed their social status through various symbolic rituals and acts. The early Iron Age saw a change in using elite symbols from wet contexts to the funeral sphere and in the character of funerary assemblages. The focus in the Scheldt basin shifted to the east and the south in central Belgium, with the emergence of a regional elite in the Dyle and Haine valleys, two tributary rivers. At the beginning of the late Iron Age, the Kemmelberg in south-west Belgium appeared as a new centre of power.

Keywords:   Bronze Age, Scheldt, elite, archaeology, social status, Iron Age, funerary assemblage

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