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Atlantic Europe in the First Millennium BCCrossing the Divide$
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Tom Moore and Xosê-Lois Armada

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780199567959

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2015

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:osobl/9780199567959.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 28 October 2020

Examples of Social Modelling in the Seine Valley during the Late Bronze Age and Early Iron Age

Examples of Social Modelling in the Seine Valley during the Late Bronze Age and Early Iron Age

Chapter:
(p.319) 14 Examples of Social Modelling in the Seine Valley during the Late Bronze Age and Early Iron Age
Source:
Atlantic Europe in the First Millennium BC
Author(s):

Rebecca Peake

Régis Issenmann

Valérie Delattre

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:osobl/9780199567959.003.0014

This chapter presents examples of social modelling in the Seine valley from the late Bronze Age and the early Iron Age (fourteenth–fifth century BC) using data from funerary and settlement contexts. It illustrates the strong socio-economic hierarchy of settlements at the end of the early Iron Age in a certain part of France. Organization viewed here on a micro-regional level is based on polarized networks which formed around the dominant agglomerations, defining territories, the diameter of which averages 8 km, which are heavily influenced by the environmental context. The profound socio-economic changes which took place during this period influenced the geographical distribution of funerary sites as well as of settlements.

Keywords:   rescue archaeology, Seine valley, social modelling, late Bronze Age, early Iron Age, socio-economic hierarchy, settlements, funerary sites

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