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Ancient Rome as a MuseumPower, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting$
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Steven Rutledge

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780199573233

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2015

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:osobl/9780199573233.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 26 September 2021

Epilogue

Epilogue

Chapter:
(p.311) Nine Epilogue
Source:
Ancient Rome as a Museum
Author(s):

Steven H. Rutledge

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:osobl/9780199573233.003.0009

This Epilogue summarizes the book's main themes and presents some final thoughts. The present study has considered the ways in which material arrived in Rome, how it was cared for, and, through a series of admittedly artificial categories, has tried to excavate to a limited extent how various cultural property was expressive of Roman values and identity. This Epilogue concludes that prestige objects produced by top name artists, women with healing powers as purveyors of magic, idiosyncratic statues, place as conservator of historic memory, all abide in the modern as they did in the ancient city, complete with an extensive bureaucracy to preserve the city's cultural patrimony, rendering the modern city as much a place of memory and wonder as the ancient.

Keywords:   ancient Rome, Roman identity, cultural materials, artefacts

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