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Best Practices for Technology-Enhanced Teaching and LearningConnecting to Psychology and the Social Sciences$
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Dana S. Dunn, Janie H. Wilson, James Freeman, and Jeffrey R. Stowell

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780199733187

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2015

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:osobl/9780199733187.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 04 December 2020

Approach or Avoidance?

Approach or Avoidance?

Understanding Technology’s Place in Teaching and Learning

Chapter:
(p.17) 2 Approach or Avoidance?
Source:
Best Practices for Technology-Enhanced Teaching and Learning
Author(s):

Dana S. Dunn

Janie H. Wilson

James E. Freeman

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:osobl/9780199733187.003.0002

This chapter considers the costs and benefits of integrating new technologies into the classroom. It begins by discussing the potential benefits that technology provides within and beyond traditional classrooms. It then tempers enthusiasm for technology by raising some caveats that educators should consider. Following arguments both pro and con, it offers suggestions on how teachers should go about deciding which technology to use, how much of it, and why. It makes the case that whenever new technologies are introduced, teachers should carefully assess the educational benefit of these tools where student learning is concerned. Educators need to do a cost-benefit analysis before deciding to adopt a new technology. The chapter concludes by recommending that technology's role in any course should be periodically re-evaluated.

Keywords:   new technology, education, classroom, teaching, learning, teachers, cost-benefit analysis

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