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Dancing with Broken BonesPoverty, Race, and Spirit-filled Dying in the Inner City$
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David Wendell Moller

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780199760138

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2015

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:osobl/9780199760138.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 28 October 2020

Introduction

Introduction

Dancing with Broken Bones: A Revisit

Chapter:
(p.3) Introduction
Source:
Dancing with Broken Bones
Author(s):

David Wendell Moller

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:osobl/9780199760138.003.0009

This introductory chapter begins by describing the twentieth-century American culture of avoidance of acknowledging the urban poor and the dying. This is a culture of seeing death as an enemy to be conquered. It narrates the compilation of remarkable encounters with the following people: Lucille Angel, Bill and Evelyn Wheeler, Joe Noble, J. W. Greene, Annie Dickens, Ken and Virble White, and Marvin “Cowboy” Smith through his initiative—the Dancing with the Broken Bones project. It also explores the lessons learned from Hurricane Katrina. It notes that both the lessons from Katrina and the lessons in Dancing with Broken Bones point to the widespread avoidance of issues that surround poverty and race in America.

Keywords:   twentieth-century American culture, deliberate avoidance, Dancing with the Broken Bones project, Hurricane Katrina, poverty, death

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