Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Shared Responsibility, Shared RiskGovernment, Markets and Social Policy in the Twenty-First Century$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Jacob Hacker and Ann O'Leary

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780199781911

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: February 2015

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:osobl/9780199781911.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 30 November 2020

Government’s Role in Aging and Long-Term Care

Government’s Role in Aging and Long-Term Care

Chapter:
(p.229) 12 Government’s Role in Aging and Long-Term Care
Source:
Shared Responsibility, Shared Risk
Author(s):

Andrew E. Scharlach

Amanda J. Lehning

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:osobl/9780199781911.003.0012

This chapter discusses the government's role in providing long-term care (LTC) for the elderly. It begins by considering the context of a long-term care policy in the United States, including LTC settings and financing, before turning to a discussion of the economic costs and risks associated with LTC. More precisely, it examines the disparities in care needs and related costs, with emphasis on Medicaid, and how public reimbursement and regulatory policies have contributed to these disparities. The chapter also outlines the causes of the increasing economic risk and responsibility for LTC assumed by older adults and their families before concluding with proposed policy solutions to ensure a more equitable distribution of LTC costs and burdens.

Keywords:   long-term care, elderly, United States, financing, economic costs, economic risk, public reimbursement, regulatory policies, Medicaid

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .