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Shared Responsibility, Shared RiskGovernment, Markets and Social Policy in the Twenty-First Century$
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Jacob Hacker and Ann O'Leary

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780199781911

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: February 2015

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:osobl/9780199781911.001.0001

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Seeing, Bearing, and Sharing Risk

Seeing, Bearing, and Sharing Risk

Social Policy Challenges for Our Time

Chapter:
(p.253) 13 Seeing, Bearing, and Sharing Risk
Source:
Shared Responsibility, Shared Risk
Author(s):

Martha Minow

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:osobl/9780199781911.003.0013

This chapter focuses on the social shift of economic risk to individuals and the need to overcome the barriers—psychological, cognitive, analytic, and ideological—to understanding the risk allocation. It begins with a historical overview of risks to human health, welfare, and well-being before explaining why it is difficult to see risk and its shift from government and businesses to individuals and families. It then looks at policy proposals to address these shifts, from income support to consumer credit reforms. The chapter concludes by arguing that democratic action toward addressing social policy challenges posed by these shifts is not possible in the absence of a greater sense of shared risks and shared responsibility.

Keywords:   economic risk, risk allocation, health, welfare, well-being, income support, consumer credit, shared risks, shared responsibility, social policy

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