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Jonathan M. Yeager

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780199916955

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2015

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:osobl/9780199916955.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (oxford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 03 December 2020

A Gospel Call to Sinners

A Gospel Call to Sinners

Chapter:
(p.300) 47 A Gospel Call to Sinners
Source:
Early Evangelicalism
Author(s):

Henry Alline

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:osobl/9780199916955.003.0048

This chapter presents excerpts from Henry Alline's A Sermon, Preached at Fort-Midway: On the 19th of February, 1783. Alline was the foremost revivalist in Canada and made a significant contribution to early evangelicalism there. His itinerate preaching in the 1770s and 1780s initiated a series of revivals in Nova Scotia that spilled over into northern New England. As an evangelist, Alline consistently stressed the need for the new birth. Alline rejected the notion that individuals were predestined to heaven or hell, and instead told his listeners that they had the power to choose to follow or reject Christ and would be held accountable for their decisions. His Sermon, Preached at Fort-Midway was published shortly before his death in 1784. In this sermon, Alline confirms his belief that everyone has the ability to turn from sin and seek eternal salvation.

Keywords:   sermon, Henry Alline, Canada, evangelicalism, preaching, new birth, sin, eternal salvation

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